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High-Profile Blunders In Will County Cases

Drew Peterson

Former Bolingbrook police sergeant Drew Peterson arrives at the Will County Courthouse in Joliet, Ill., Friday, May 8, 2009, for his arraignment on charges of first-degree murder in the 2004 death of his former wife Kathleen Savio. (M. Spender Green/AP)

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WILL COUNTY, Ill. (CBS) - This is not the first time that law enforcers in Will County have arrested and charged a wrong suspect. There have been several blunders by investigators and prosecutors in that county over the years.

As late as 7 p.m. Tuesday, the Will County State’s Attorney’s website had a story posted front and center on the homepage, boasting about the arrest of a suspect in the two-state shootings. The boasting didn’t last long.

“I feel horrible that Brian Dorian went through this. And I certainly would apologize for any inconvenience that he has suffered,” said Will County State’s Attorney James Glasgow.

But you don’t have to go far into Will County’s history to find other mistakes.

Kevin Fox spent eight months behind bars as a suspect in the murder of his daughter Riley, 3, until freed by DNA evidence.

Riley’s family says investigators had evidence that pointed to a different man from the start. Scott Wayne Eby was arrested and charged with Riley’s murder earlier this year. He has pleaded not guilty.

“It seems like they had all the pieces to the puzzle right in front of them, but they created evidence against Kevin instead,” said Melissa Fox, Riley’s mother.

Other high-profile cases in Will County include the Lane Bryant murders, where five women were shot to death at a Lane Bryant store during a botched robbery attempt in February 2008, and a sixth woman was shot but survived. Tinley Park police are still sifting through tips in that case.

In the Lisa Stebic case, the Plainfield resident was last seen in April 2007. Her husband, Craig Stebic, has been named by police as a person of interest in her disappearance. No charges have been filed in the case.

But perhaps the highest profile misstep in recent history may have been the Kathleen Savio investigation in 2004. She was Drew Peterson’s third wife. Her death was originally ruled an accident – a drowning in a bathtub.

But after Peterson’s fourth wife, Stacy Peterson, vanished, investigators exhumed Savio and took a second look.

“Normal, healthy adults don’t die accidentally in bathtubs,” said Dr. Michael Baden, pathologist.

Peterson is now awaiting trial for the murder of Kathleen Savio.

James Glasgow was not the Will County State’s Attorney at the time of either the Riley Fox or the Kathleen Savio murder.