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Dold, Seals Battle For 10th Congressional District

Seals Dold

Democrat Dan Seals (left) and Republican Bob Dold are battling for the 10th Congressional District. (CBS)

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CHICAGO (CBS) – The North Shore will have a new congressman. With incumbent Mark Kirk running for Senate, either Democrat Dan Seals or Republican Bob Dold will take over in what’s turning out to be a nasty battle in the north suburban 10th Congressional District.

CBS 2′s Vince Gerasole reports on the issues that might make a difference on Election Day.

Whether you’re Dan Seals or Bob Dold, you know voters in your district sent Democrats to the White House, while choosing Republicans for Congress.

“The thing I’ll tell you about our district is it tends to vote the candidate and less party line,” said Seals.

“There are so many people here that identify themselves as independents, and they vote for the person,” said Dold.

This time around, both Republican Dold and Democrat Seals say they’re fiscally responsible candidates reaching out to small business.

“We’ve seen unemployment go up in all quarters and folks are having a hard time,” said Seals. “I think the best way to get them back to work is by focusing on small business.”

“I run a business. I meet a payroll, I meet a budget,” said Dold. “I understand what those folks are going through right now.”

Though on the social issue of abortion, both are pro-choice, Seals, in ads, has charged Dold is too extreme on the issue.

Dold’s support of parental notification and other potential limitations has earned him recommendations from several pro-life groups that he doesn’t dispute. It makes him a social moderate with conservative support.

“I’m pro-choice,” said Dold. “I’ve said that right from the get-go.”

“Saying it doesn’t make it true, when Illinois Right to Life is recommending you,” said Seals.

Planned Parenthood says Seals is the only pro-choice candidate, but the Chicago Tribune, on its editorial page Monday, charged the Seals ads are misleading, stating: “We’re not impressed that Seals would give voters false ideas about his opponent’s views on abortion.”

Seals takes issue with the paper’s conclusion.

“Having groups like that, who care a lot about these issues, when they come out and endorse you, they don’t do it for no reason,” said Seals.

“I am a moderate, and that’s the thing. I’m not going to hide who I am and what I stand for,” said Dold.

Social moderate Dold’s fiscal conservatism has also earned him the backing of several Tea Party advocates.

Seals, who is running for the third time, believes it might be a charm for him.

The independent Capitol Hill paper, The Hill, has Seals out in front by 12 points.