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Mutilated Goats Found In Gary Creek

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File Photo Of A Butchered Goat. (Ulet Ifansasti/Getty Images)

File Photo Of A Butchered Goat. (Ulet Ifansasti/Getty Images)

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GARY, Ind. (STMW) – The overwhelming smell of rotting flesh tipped off construction workers on Tuesday morning that someone had dumped at least seven decapitated goats at an Indiana creek — again.

“We found about a dozen goats near the side of the road just after Halloween last year,” G.W. Berkheimer Co. store manager Doug Johnston said. “They were all headless and their legs were bound with duct tape.”

Across the street from the tall, thick brush at the corner of 35th Avenue and Chase Street plastic bags filled with goat body parts were strewn in the parking lot of a shuttered chop shop.

Johnston said they contacted police about both incidents, but he wasn’t sure why anyone would want to mutilate goats.

Neither Gary Police nor Animal Control had any information on the incidents.

The Boyd crew was using a broken telephone pole to ram through a dam formed by enterprising beavers inside the culvert.

G.W. Berkheimer Co. coordinator Mark Konrady said the rise in the water table caused the business’ septic tank to leak into its parking lot, which is a quarter-mile east of where the goats were found.

Workers weren’t sure of how long the carcasses may have been out there.

The creek is a popular dumping site, with computer monitors, 50-gallon chemical drums and beer bottles strewn along the creek’s embankment.

“Every winter we get at least one car that plunges into the creek because the road gets slick,” Konrady said.

Konrady said the company will start on construction to hook into the city’s sewer system next week, which would avoid sewage overflows.

Konrady said the city took over maintenance of the creek, which runs parallel to 35th Avenue, from the Little Calumet River Basin Development Commission. But he said businesses and farmers have learned not to wait for the city to do things.

“We’ve spent upward of $20,000 to tear down dams and other work,” he said.

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