Consumer

Get Smoother Skin Without Surgery Or Needles

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DermaSweep Skin Care Procedure

The DermaSweep procedure uses a vacuum device to exfoliate the skin, increase blood circulation and plump up collagen, then later the device infuses the skin with nutrients. (Credit: CBS)

CBS Chicago (con't)

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CHICAGO (CBS) – There’s a new way to get smooth, younger looking skin without surgery or needles. It’s a treatment called DermaSweep.

CBS 2’s Mary Kay Kleist reports that, whether it’s designing a beautiful room or looking her best, Barbara Blair is all about everything being pretty. To keep her skin looking pretty, Barbara has been getting a new treatment called DermaSweep.

It starts with a vacuum device attached to tiny brushes, it’s supposed to exfoliate the skin, increase blood circulation and plump up collagen.

“It’s actually the vacuum itself that’s lifting the skin and polishing it,” said clinical aesthetician Betsy Rubenstone.

The second part of the treatment reverses the vacuum action, with a push-pull affect, to infuse nutrients into the skin.

There are a variety of infusions that include things like Vitamin C and hyaluronic acid. This new micro-dermabrasion therapy is supposed to make cells regenerate faster, to produce tighter, clear skin.

“The dermal affect of these infusions actually turn the skin around and really make this cell rotation work much more efficiently,” Rubenstone said.

Before and after pictures from the maker of DermaSweep show subtle improvements to fine lines and skin tone.

“My skin was just glowing. I could just see it was softer, smoother,” Blair said.

Blair, 56, just started the series of treatments, but she said her skin looks younger after the first one.

“It’s unbelievable. It’s instant gratification,” she said.

While Blair liked the results of her first treatment, some people can have irritated, flaky skin initially, before it starts looking better.

DermaSweep is a series of six treatments, about four weeks apart. Each one costs up to $350. It was tested and developed at the University of California, but it doesn’t have to be reviewed or approved by the FDA.

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