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Blagojevich Wants To Report To Prison ‘With Dignity’

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Former Illinois Governor Rod Blagojevich (L) addresses the media while wife Patti Blagojevich holds back tears at the Dirksen Federal Building after he was sentenced to 14 years in prison. (Credit: Frank Polich/Getty Images)

Former Illinois Governor Rod Blagojevich (L) addresses the media while wife Patti Blagojevich holds back tears at the Dirksen Federal Building after he was sentenced to 14 years in prison. (Credit: Frank Polich/Getty Images)

John Cody John Cody
John Cody is a veteran reporter for Newsradio 780.
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CHICAGO (CBS) – The once very public Rod Blagojevich is now seeking privacy for the start of his 14-year prison term at a low-security prison outside Denver.

As WBBM Newsradio’s John Cody reports, the former governor went on a national media blitz after he was arrested on corruption charges to blast prosecutors. He also appeared on Donald Trump’s reality TV show “Celebrity Apprentice,” and hosted a radio talk show before his trial.

But since his conviction on 18 corruption charges, Blagojevich has largely avoided the spotlight.

LISTEN: WBBM Newsradio’s John Cody Reports

Defense attorney Carolyn Gurland, who is leading the former governor’s appeal, said Blagojevich wants to surrender “with dignity” when he reports to prison next month. He hopes it will be a private moment, not one surrounded by reporters.

In exactly one month, Blagojevich is due to report to prison.

At Blagojevich’s request, U.S. District Judge James Zagel recommended the former governor serve his time at the Englewood federal prison in Littleton, Colo., near Denver.

Englewood has both a low-security prison and a prison camp.

Located less than an hour from Denver, it would be a relatively easy commute from Chicago, should his wife and daughters remain in the city.

Blagojevich has also sought to be enrolled in a drug and alcohol treatment program which, combined with good behavior, could trim his prison term to about 11 years.

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