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Cop Accused Of Calling In Fake Bar Fight To Escape DUI Arrest

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Chicago Police officer Sean Patrick Dailey charged with disorderly conduct for making a false police report to avoid a DUI in Niles.  (Photo Courtesy Chicago Sun-Times)

Chicago Police officer Sean Patrick Dailey charged with disorderly conduct for making a false police report to avoid a DUI in Niles. (Photo Courtesy Chicago Sun-Times)

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CHICAGO (CBS) – A Chicago Police officer falsely reported a raucous bar fight so he could avoid a possible DUI arrest in northwest suburban Niles, Cook County prosecutors said Wednesday.

Sean Dailey, 33, was apparently hoping the suburban officer who stopped him in the early morning hours of Nov. 5, 2010, would be asked to respond to the phony brawl at the Cheers bar on Oakton, prosecutors said.

The Niles officer did get called away, assistant state’s attorney Lynn McCarthy said. But en route, the officer’s colleagues relayed on police radio that there was never a fight, so he returned to Milwaukee Avenue where Dailey had been parked. However, Dailey, an 11-year police veteran, was nowhere to be found, McCarthy said.

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Earlier, around 2 a.m., the Niles officer stopped the off-duty Dailey for speeding and failing to stop at a red light, McCarthy said. The suburban officer suspected Dailey was intoxicated, officials said, and Dailey, who announced he was a Chicago Police officer, allegedly admitted he’d been out drinking.

The Niles officer then told Dailey he couldn’t stay behind the wheel and offered several options of how he could get home, McCarthy said.

Dailey refused all suggestions but finally agreed to call a cab from the Traveler’s motel across the street, McCarthy said.

While in the motel’s vestibule, Dailey was spotted making a call on his cell phone before he went back to the suburban officer and asked if he could drive himself home, McCarthy said.

The Niles officer, parked at a gas station, repeated that it wasn’t safe for Dailey to drive so Dailey went back to the motel, saying he would make arrangements for a ride, McCarthy said. Again, Dailey dialed his cell phone, McCarthy said.

A short time later, the Niles police officer heard about a 50-person bar fight at the Cheers bar on his police radio, McCarthy said.

Several officers were dispatched to the scene and many squad cars were traveling at a high rate of speed to get to the bar swiftly, McCarthy said.

Niles police eventually traced the 911 calls about the bar fight to Dailey’s cell phone, McCarthy said.

Dailey allegedly maintained he was getting phone calls from others about the scuffle and had seen the fight. But a review of Dailey’s cell phone records show the only calls made to the Niles dispatch center at the time came from Dailey’s mobile, McCarthy said.

McCarthy didn’t give details in court as to why it took authorities over a year to charge Dailey, who lives in the 7400 block of North Odell.

More than 10 months later, in September, Dailey was arrested for another DUI in Niles when his blood alcohol content registered .14, McCarthy said. He was sentenced to court supervision after pleading guilty, McCarthy said.

Dailey, who has a master’s degree, voluntarily turned himself in to face the disorderly conduct charge, his attorney Michael Clancy said.

Judge Donald Panarese Jr. ordered Dailey held on $10,000 bond Wednesday.

Dailey’s relatives refused comment following the hearing.

Chicago Police spokesman Michael Sullivan did not know Dailey’s job status in the wake of his arrest.

(Source: Sun-Times Media Wire © Chicago Sun-Times 2012. All Rights Reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.)

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