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Climatologist: Warm Weather Hasn’t Affected Soil Water Levels

Englewood Garden

This garden is bringing a community together in Englewood. (Credit: CBS)

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CHICAGO (CBS) — The unusually warm weather this past winter has not had much of an impact on water levels for growing crops, plants and grass, according to a climatologist.

As WBBM Newwsradio’s Bernie Tafoya reports, Mike Timlin, regional climatologist at the Midwestern Regional Climate Center, says water levels “are not in too bad a shape” and that there’s pretty good moisture in the soil.

LISTEN: WBBM Newsradio’s Bernie Tafoya reports

He notes we didn’t have a lot of snow this past winter and, whatever rain we got, replenished groundwater supplies.

Timlin says it helped that the ground really didn’t freeze much and when it snowed or rained, the ground soaked up the water easily.

If the ground had been frozen, the water would have runoff the soil.

The climatologist says one big worry is if we get normal March and April conditions at any point.

“Typical last freezes are in April, so we’ve got a pretty good chance of having a freeze,” Timlin said, “and if we have a significant freeze with everything already blooming, it could be a big problem.”

Should you be watering your plants or grass yet? Timlin says water levels can vary even from one part of the city to another, so you’ll have to decide that for yourself.