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Tunney: Suggestion To Move Wrigley Scoreboard ‘Dismissed’

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dellimore250 Craig Dellimore
Craig Dellimore, political editor for WBBM, joined the station in 1983...
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CHICAGO (CBS) – Wrigleyville Alderman Tom Tunney is dismissing reports that he wants to demolish the iconic Center Field scoreboard as part of proposed renovations at Wrigley Field, reports WBBM Political Editor Craig Dellimore

44 th Ward Alderman Tom Tunney says he knows the importance of preserving and renovating Wrigley Field, and he says a number of ideas have been offered and discussed. Some sources say Tunney suggested tearing down the Landmarked centerfield scoreboard to make way for a video screen that would NOT block the view of nearby rooftop taverns.

But, as first reported on WBBM Newsradio, Tunney says the idea offered was to move the scoreboard to left field, where—he says—a similar one existed until the 1930’s.

“No one seriously talked about destroying the landmark scoreboard. It was never in anyone’s discussion whatsoever,” he said.

The Alderman says that just one of many ideas that have been on the table. And—he says—it was discussed in earnest by all parties and dismissed.

Tunney says this flap all started because the Cubs want to put a six thousand square foot video board in left field. Tunney says he wanted to know how that compared with the existing scoreboard in Center Field. He says the Cubs owners said the scoreboard was about 1,750 feet, considerably smaller than the video board.

Tunney says that’s when the idea was floated to put the videoboard in Center field and move the Scoreboard left. Tunney says it would still block the views of rooftop clubs, but not nearly as much. The idea, he says, was dismissed. But no one—he says—proposed demolishing the scoreboard.

He says he hopes solutions can be reached that are in keeping with the character of the community and the desires of the Cubs.