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Suburban Residents Begin Clean-Up From Flooding

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Beck was finally able to return to his home he was being evacuated by boat on Friday.  (Credit: Lisa Fielding)

Beck was finally able to return to his home he was being evacuated by boat on Friday. (Credit: Lisa Fielding)

(Credit: Lisa Fielding) Lisa Fielding
Lisa Fielding is a news anchor and reporter for Newsradio 780....
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DES PLAINES, Ill. (CBS) — Sewage drains are on overdrive on Barry Lane as river waters from the Des Plaines finally recede.

“This street was a lake, it came in so fast, I didn’t even have time to get the cars out,” said homeowner Ed Beck.

Beck was finally able to return to his home he was being evacuated by boat on Friday. Five days later, he got his first look at his basement that at one point had 9 feet of water floor to ceiling.

“This was a fully furnished basement. We lost furniture, carpeting, a TV on the wall, our water heater, a workshop,” he said.

Beck says they’ve gotten two ‘floods of the century’ in the last five years. He’s says he’s had enough.

“We’ve learned our lesson this time around. We’re headed to higher ground. This Des Plaines river is too unpredictable.”

Meantime, Street crews are everywhere in Des Plaines helping to clean up debris and make sure motorists don’t bypass flood barriers.

“Motorists are still disobeying barriers and attempting to drive through standing water and they end up walking away in waist high water with a broken car,” said acting Mayor Mark Walsten.
Walsten says the Des Plaines River surpassed the peak flood stage of 1986 and broke the record by a half an inch, close to 11 feet.

Sewage drains are on overdrive on Barry Lane as river waters from the Des Plaines finally recede. (Credit: Lisa Fielding)

Sewage drains are on overdrive on Barry Lane as river waters from the Des Plaines finally recede. (Credit: Lisa Fielding)

He says the cleanup is still an ‘all hands on deck’ operation.

“we are still on high mode of operation, 12 hour shifts. It’s going to cost dearly but the money doesn’t matter.We are worried about taking care of the city itself and its residents.”

“We are continuing to monitor the streets. Oakton street is now open. We are working on River Road and after that some smaller streets,” he said.

Elk Street near the McDonald’s museum is still closed due to high waters.

Several city workers from other villages and towns have joined Des Plaines in helping clear debris and sandbags.

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