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Phil Jackson Compares Jordan & Bryant

Kobe Bryant and Michael Jordan. (Photo credit should read VINCENT LAFORET/AFP/Getty Images)

Kobe Bryant and Michael Jordan. (Photo credit should read VINCENT LAFORET/AFP/Getty Images)

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(CBS) For the first time, former Bulls and Lakers coach Phil Jackson is making the comparison the sporting world has waited for.

Jackson, who coached both Michael Jordan and Kobe Bryant in the prime of their careers to a combined 11 NBA Finals championships, had often kept quiet when asked to compare the two players – until now.

In his book, Eleven Rings, which comes out next week, Jackson discusses the strengths and weaknesses of two of the game’s greatest players.

Check out some passages from the book below.

On basketball mindsets:

“Michael was more likely to break through his attackers with power and strength, while Kobe often tries to finesse his way through mass pileups,” Jackson wrote. “Michael was stronger, with bigger shoulders and a sturdier frame. He also had large hands that allowed him to control the ball better and make subtle fakes.

“Jordan was also more naturally inclined to let the game come to him and not overplay his hand, whereas Kobe tends to force the action, especially when the game isn’t going his way. When his shot is off, Kobe will pound away relentlessly until his luck turns. Michael, on the other hand, would shift his attention to defense or passing or setting screens to help the team win the game.”

On overall leadership:

“One of the biggest differences between the two stars from my perspective was Michael’s superior skills as a leader,” Jackson said. “Though at times he could be hard on his teammates, Michael was masterful at controlling the emotional climate of the team with the power of his presence. Kobe had a long way to go before he could make that claim. He talked a good game, but he’d yet to experience the cold truth of leadership in his bones, as Michael had.”

Bryant gradually evolved during the 2008-09 championship season, when the Lakers successfully retooled with a more finessed look with Pau Gasol instead of the brute force of the Shaquille O’Neal teams.

If Bryant talked to teammates in his earlier Lakers years, it was usually, “Give me the damn ball,” Jackson wrote. “But then Kobe started to shift. He embraced the team and his teammates, calling them up when we were on the road and inviting them out to dinner. It was as if the other players were now his partners, not his personal spear-carriers.”

Check out a full excerpt here.