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30 Hurt In Asiana Airlines Crash Seek Records From Boeing

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The wrecked fuselage of Asiana Airlines flght 214 sits in a storage area at San Francisco International Airport on July 12, 2013 in San Francisco, California. Nearly one week after Asiana Airlines flight 214 crash landed at San Francisco International Airport, the wrecked fuselage was moved from the runway. Two people died in the crash and hundreds were injured. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

The wrecked fuselage of Asiana Airlines flght 214 sits in a storage area at San Francisco International Airport on July 12, 2013 in San Francisco, California. Nearly one week after Asiana Airlines flight 214 crash landed at San Francisco International Airport, the wrecked fuselage was moved from the runway. Two people died in the crash and hundreds were injured. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

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(STMW) — Thirty people hurt when Asiana Airlines Flight 214 crashed at a San Francisco airport earlier this month filed a petition for discovery Monday against Boeing, the Chicago-based maker of the airline involved in the crash.

The Boeing 777 was carrying 307 passengers and crewmembers when it crashed July 6 while attempting to land at San Francisco International Airport. Three people were killed and 182 other people were hurt.

The petitioners — including one U.S. national and 29 residents of China, four of whom are minors — filed the petition Monday in Cook County Circuit Court.

They are asking Boeing to produce all documents identifying anyone who owned or leased the aircraft, as well as maintenance records for work performed on the plane during the time it was operated by Asiana Airlines.

The court document also asks Boeing to identify the manufacturers and designers of many of the plane’s components, including the altimeter, autopilot software, auto throttle and evacuation slides, among others.

It also seeks records on any instructor who trained the pilots on the operations of the Boeing 777 model aircraft, as well as the names of any Boeing customer service or field service representatives assigned to plane that crashed.

Boeing previously said it sent a technical team to assist the National Transportation Safety Board as it investigates the crash.

The company did not immediately return a call seeking comment on the petition.

(Source: Sun-Times Media Wire © Chicago Sun-Times 2013. All Rights Reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.)

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