Experience With Helping Others Has Uplifted Chicago Companies And Communities

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(credit: Thinkstock)

(credit: Thinkstock)

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Succeeding in the field of business can be difficult, whether it’s the small mom-and-pop shop or the Fortune 1000 company. Jeff Carpenter is an example of how a business degree can help other organizations deliver recurring, scalable and measurable performance gains. Jeff is a member of Entrepreneurs’ Organization Chicago and principal of Caveo Learning, a learning consulting firm that provides learning solutions to Fortune 1000 and other leading organizations.

(Photo Courtesy of Jeff Carpenter)

(Photo Courtesy of Jeff Carpenter)

What is your background education and how does it relate to your field?
 
“I have a Bachelor of Arts in Human Resource Management and a Masters of Arts in Training and Development. For the last 10 years, I have been the founding principal of Caveo Learning, where we deliver ROI-focused strategic learning consulting and performance solutions enabled by learning technologies, which is what separates a high-performing company from those that lag in their industries.”

What inspired you to enter this field?
 
“I knew continuous education was the difference maker for careers and businesses. Internal learning and development departments were being marginalized and not being viewed as a strategic asset. Without proper learning strategies and solutions that are aligned with the goals and objectives of the organization, the learning organization becomes a cost center and continuous education sputters to a stop.”

What advice can you offer others looking to go into business?
 
“A business degree is the foundation; the enabler to make you better at your passion. If you have an understanding of how your passion works within the context of business, you will be a step ahead of others graduating with the same major. The lens you look through as you approach your work, issues and interact with other parts of the business will be different. While the degree opens doors for career opportunities, employers are looking for how you approach a business problem, analyze the information and formulate a solution that positively impacts the business. The best advice would be to major in your passion and minor in business.”

Sara Lugardo is a professional writer out of Chicago, Illinois. She has a Bachelor’s in Communication and is currently working on her Master’s. Her work can be found on Examiner.com.

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