Six Food Favorites Affected By Climate ChangeThe effects of climate change are far-reaching, affecting not only weather, but more critical parts of human life such as food.
America The Beautiful (And Freezing)Many parts of the U.S. have already broken records for snowfall and below zero temperatures while other parts have seen unseasonably warm temperatures.
Wet Weather Brings Resurgence For FirefliesThere's a good chance your backyard is full of fireflies this summer, which is a big change from last year.
Snowstorm Should Help Ground Moisture Levels In Chicago AreaIt might be tough to drive in, but Tuesday's snowstorm should bring some benefits to the Chicago area.
Trees Could Use Watering and Mulching During Snow Drought, Experts SayExperts say the lack of snow -- coming off of an extremely dry summer -- is literally stressing trees out. CBS 2's Dana Kozlov reports.
Continuing Drought Could Lead To Reversal Of Chicago River FlowIn a new report, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers said, if Chicago doesn’t get some significant rain or snow soon, there could be serious water flow issues in the Chicago River.
Lack Of Snow Is Actually Bad NewsIt has not been a white winter so far in Chicago, as the city has recorded barely more than an inch of snow.
Climatologist: Last Year's Warm Temps, Dry Conditions Brutal For FarmersIllinois has just lived through the second warmest and tenth driest year on record.
Snow Mostly A No-Show In Chicago, So FarThe question remains: Why haven't we had more snow? CBS 2's Suzanne Le Mignot reports.
Drought Driving Up Cost Of Your Thanksgiving Turkey Just in time for your Thanksgiving dinner, prices at the grocery store are going up.
Food Pantries Seeing Spike In Visits Due To Rising Food PricesWith all the rain we've had lately, we might forget we had a serious drought this summer, and that the drought will have a big impact on food prices this fall.
Rain From Isaac Won't Help Dried-Out Corn Crop In IllinoisIllinois going to get a little of the Isaac rain that had been aimed at the gulf coast, but likely not enough to affect Illinois agriculture.