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Best Ways To Experience The Presidential Inauguration In Chicago

January 7, 2013 6:00 AM

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(Credit: dusablemuseum.org)

(Credit: dusablemuseum.org)

By Magdalene Paniotte

A prestigious institution of higher learning once graced with educational lectures from our president elect, The University of Chicago is an ideal place to visit during the 2013 inaugural ceremony. These important landmarks in Hyde Park are well worth considering at this historic time.

(Credit: explorechicago.org)

(Credit: explorechicago.org)

Lorado Taft’s “Fountain of Time”
Cottage Grove Ave. and 59th St.
Chicago, IL 60637
www.explorechicago.org

An abstract sculpture displaying humanity as seen through the eyes of renowned Chicago artist Lorado Taft, “Fountain of Time” extends approximately 126 feet in length and took 12 years to complete. Inspired by Henry Austin Dobson’s eloquent poem “Paradox of Time,” the installation depicts streams of people experiencing the passage of life in a range of emotions within proximity of a cloaked figure symbolizing Father Time. A politically relevant and beautiful work of art, the fountain was dedicated to Chicago in 1922 as a monument to a 100-year peace treaty between the United States and Great Britain.

(Credit: dusablemuseum.org)

(Credit: dusablemuseum.org)

DuSable Museum of African American History
740 E. 56th Place
Chicago, IL 60637
(773) 947-0600
www.dusablemuseum.org

Established in 1961 by Margaret Burroughs and other prominent Chicago business people, the museum’s great mission is to impart a deeper understanding and appreciation of the African American experience and cultural heritage. Toward that endeavor, DuSable has amassed an eclectic collection of more than 15,000 paintings, prints, sculptures and artifacts. Named in honor of Jean Baptiste DuSable, a Haitian of African and French origin and the first pioneer to settle in Chicago, the museum celebrates African American artistic accomplishments through numerous exhibits, special events and educational workshops.

(Credit: gowright.org)

(Credit: gowright.org)


Frank Lloyd Wright’s Robie House
5757 S. Woodlawn Ave.
Chicago, IL 60637

(312) 994-4000 
www.gowright.org

Regarded by many as the finest American architect of the 20th century, Frank (Lincoln) Lloyd Wright expressed a childhood interest in architecture, spending countless hours with a set of educational building blocks that his mother brought home one afternoon. The geometric shapes were of a smooth maple wood that could be arranged into various three-dimensional concepts, inspiring the youth to develop a lifelong passion for architectural design. The historic Robie House is modeled after the Prairie style and considered one of Mr. Wright’s most important works, adhering to the principles of structural design in harmony with natural elements.             

(Credit: maps.uchicago.edu/\)

(Credit: maps.uchicago.edu/\)


“Nuclear Energy” by Henry Moore
5621 S. Ellis Ave.
Chicago, IL 60637
www.maps.uchicago.edu

Commemorating the site of the world’s first nuclear chain reaction splitting the atom, the 12-foot bronze “Nuclear Energy” sculpture was erected on the University of Chicago campus by British artist Henry Moore in 1967 to mark the 25th anniversary of the atomic age. The groundbreaking experiment was initiated by University scientists in collaboration with Italian physicist Enrico Fermi, also known as the “Father of the Atomic Bomb.” Interestingly, the abstract sculpture is reminiscent of a human skull with hollow spaces open to interpretation. A working model of the piece may also be seen at the Hiroshima Museum of Contemporary Art.

(Credit: rockefeller.uchicago.edu)

(Credit: rockefeller.uchicago.edu)


Rockefeller Memorial Chapel
5850 S. Woodlawn Ave.
Chicago, IL 60637
(773) 702-2100
www.rockefeller.uchicago.edu

Designed by architect Bertram Goodhue, the Rockefeller Memorial Chapel is a stunning work of gothic architecture built in 1928 in memory of John D. Rockefeller who was the founder of the University of Chicago. The Cathedral’s exterior is decorated with rows of over a hundred ornate figural sculptures representing the humanities, philosophy and religion. The exquisite stained-glass windows and intricate wood carvings of the interior adorn stone pillars and grand vaulted ceilings. A center for religious activities as well as University special events, the Cathedral is a culturally enriching spiritual atmosphere and focal point on campus.

Magdalene Paniotte is from Chicago and very pleased to be a CBS Contributor. She has a Bachelor of Arts Degree in Theatre and has studied creative writing at the graduate level. Maggie enjoys composing articles and developing her voice as a freelance writer. Her work can also be found at Examiner.com.

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