CHICAGO (WBBM) — Roughly 80 percent of the public schools in Chicago have not met federal testing targets this year, despite a litany of reforms.

As WBBM Newsradio 780’s Dave Marsett reports, that leaves Mayor Richard M. Daley’s successor with quite a bit of work ahead.

LISTEN: Newsradio 780’s Dave Marsett Reports

The mayor started revamping the Chicago Public Schools system 15 years ago. The then-Republican-led Illinois General Assembly gave Mayor Daley direct control of the school system in 1995.

The system was reorganized so it was led by a chief executive officer rather than a superintendent. The 1995 revamp also created a board of trustees that was appointed directly by the mayor, rather than an outside School Board Nominating Commission.

Among the many other changes in the 1995 legislation was a refocusing of resources on student achievement, and a pledge to ensure academic improvement through accountability councils.

But despite all the changes, the Chicago Tribune says the massive organization is still plagued by academic failure, budget problems and debilitating social conditions.

The paper says the new mayor will have to decide which reforms to keep and which to throw out, and some are even questioning whether the next mayor should even continue to handle the CPS system.