(CBS) On Wednesday, Cubs president of business operations Crane Kenney revealed in an interview with the Mully and Hanley Show that the organization gave an “extensive” look at moving all of its 2015 home games to Miller Park in Milwaukee as renovations of Wrigley Field are underway (and currently running behind schedule).

Kenney didn’t touch on a question that many were left to ask later. Why didn’t the Cubs consider moving those games nine miles south to U.S. Cellular Field, home of the rival White Sox? The clubs don’t have overlapping home dates until early June, and even after that, it’s likely the logistics could’ve been worked out. The MLB schedule generally has one team in town while the other travels.

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There’s a rather simple answer. The Cubs thought White Sox owner Jerry Reinsdorf would say no, 670 The Score host Matt Spiegel reported on air Thursday morning.

“Crane Kenney did not even ask The Cell,” Spiegel said. “You know why? Because the White Sox — despite the agreement that the White Sox have and the ownership structure with that stadium, despite the lease with the city and facilities and all that stuff — the White Sox still have final say. Reinsdorf still has final say. Crane didn’t ask because he knew that Reinsdorf would say no. He absolutely knew. Even though Reinsdorf and (Cubs owner Tom) Ricketts get along, there is no way in hell. There’s history.”

Some of that history — of the good-natured variety — includes barbs shared at each team’s respective fan conventions in January. After listening to a fan claim that U.S. Cellular Field is more appealing for children, Ricketts responded, “There can’t be that many kids having fun at U.S. Cellular,” a shot at the White Sox’s often sparsely attended games.

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The next weekend, Reinsdorf jabbed back.

“”I do sincerely hope the Cubs win a World Series,” Reinsdorf said. “After I die.”

On a more serious note, there’s a clear, practical, aesthetic reason that the White Sox wouldn’t want the Cubs to play home games at U.S. Cellular Field.

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“You want to let the Cubs go in there and outdraw your own team?” Spiegel said. “The Cubs would outdraw them at The Cell.”