CHICAGO (CBS) — It’s a bright sunny morning at Wrigley Field, and dozens of eager baseball fans wait under the famous marquee to enter one of the game’s most hallowed grounds.

“Good morning everyone, welcome to Wrigley Field,” a man says. “My name is John.”

John Metz gathers the troops for one of two daily tours he gives four days a week. A Cubs fan since he was a kid, Metz is a savant of sorts for anything Wrigley Field.

“Over the years, I’ve acquired that knowledge, but we always give new people a book about the history of Wrigley and I studied that,” he said. “I came to Wrigley Field all the time when I was a kid, so I know a lot about this place anyway.”

Metz says he gets visitors from around the world all waiting for a glimpse of the bright Kentucky bluegrass, the iconic ivy and the manual scoreboard.

“It never ceases to amaze me how people in Australia or Austria or wherever are so familiar with the ballpark,” he said.

A Cub fan since he was a kid, Metz is a savant of sorts for anything Wrigley Field. (Credit: Lisa Fielding).

A Cub fan since he was a kid, Metz is a savant of sorts for anything Wrigley Field. (Credit: Lisa Fielding).

The tour takes visitors into the seating bowl, out to the bleachers and up to the press box. Metz adds a little flavor and humor along the way.

“I try to bring a little entertainment to the program,” he said.

He figures he’s walked the park thousands of times. His favorite spot?

“My favorite spot is the visitors’ clubhouse,” he said.

Built in 1914, he says the visitors’ clubhouse is dripping with history.

“Think about the great baseball players who have stood in that clubhouse because the visitor’s clubhouse is the original clubhouse,” Metz said. “All the great baseball players have been there.”

Metz gives two tours a day for four days a week. (Credit: Lisa Fielding).

Metz gives two tours a day for four days a week. (Credit: Lisa Fielding).

Metz says he sometimes can feel the spirit of some of baseball’s most storied players who’ve passed through the hallway and into the dugout.

“Willie Mays, Henry Aaron, Roberto Clemente, Jackie Robinson, a fellow named Babe Ruth, Lou Gehrig. 1932 World Series, Babe Ruth’s called shot right here at Wrigley,” he said. “He was in the clubhouse. Everybody loves it because of its living history.”

And the history and beauty of the 101-year-old ballpark, he says, never gets old.

“The first thing that hits you is the green, the green grass, it’s so bright,” he says. “The ivy, the grass graduating to the ivy on the wall, it’s startling and then you look at the old scoreboard, that is still manually operated. It gives you goose bumps.”

The tour takes visitors into the seating bowl, out to the bleachers and up to the press box (Credit: Lisa Fielding).

The tour takes visitors into the seating bowl, out to the bleachers and up to the press box (Credit: Lisa Fielding).

Wrigley Field is one of Chicago’s top tourist destinations. For Metz, leading the way and sharing its stories is more than just a job; it’s a religious experience every day.

“This is nirvana here, I love it,” he laughed.

Wrigley Field tours are offered on game days and non-game days. There are up to 15 tours from 21 tour guides offered daily depending on the day. For schedule and ticket prices, visit Cubs.com.