By Jim Williams

CHICAGO (CBS) — The black community’s response to the tragedy and the murders of other children is being hotly debated today, reports CBS 2’s Jim Williams.

Chicago Tribune editorial cartoonist Scott Stantis is sparking controversy with his latest creation.

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“It’s been overwhelming good and bad,” said Stantis.

On the left: a drawing of 9 year old Tyshawn Lee. On the right, a city street with the caption “Still waiting for the outrage.”

“You don’t see Sharptons come down and march. You don’t see the streets full of rage and it should be,” Stantis said. “This was a beautiful kid.”

Such as the response to police shootings, when thousands march and chant.

“It’s wrong on so many levels I don’t know where to begin,” said veteran journalist Lee Bey.

Bey is critical of the cartoon and those who say African Americans are indifferent when blacks kill blacks.

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“People do care, people do protest, people do speak out, so much so the media doesn’t even covered it anymore,” Bey said.

In fact, there are countless weekend anti-violence marches in the black community. And just yesterday Father Michael Pfleger and many others in the black community expressed anger over the murder of Tyshawn Lee.

Still, Phillip Jackson CEO of the Black Star Project, a mentoring group, says protests and anger are not enough anyway.

“I don’t have time for useless emotion and that’s what people want,” Jackson said. “We don’t want outrage; we want action. We want people doing things.”

And so Jackson’s Black Star Project offers a host programs for young people.

Now, the Tribune’s Scott Stantis concedes there are anti violence marches but says they’re not as large or vocal as anti-police brutality protests.

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There is a $35,000 reward for information leading to Lee’s killer. On Wednesday afternoon, a person of interest turned themselves in for questioning.