By Audrina Bigos

CHICAGO (CBS) — Painful but necessary, that’s what the Police Accountability Task Force calls its findings and recommendations. From racism to excessive force, a draft breaks down what is called a broken system, from the top down.

The 18-page report obtained by the Chicago Tribune details problems going back decades that can “no longer be ignored.”

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The tipping point: police dashcam video showing Officer Jason Van Dyke shooting and killing Laquan McDonald.

Chicago Police Accountability Task Force

The findings come after a four month investigation by the police accountability task force: “The community’s lack of trust in CPD is justified…CPD is not doing enough to combat racial bias…CPD is not doing enough to protect human and civil rights…IPRA is badly broken.”

“I just believe that if we have a fresh set of eyes looking at what the department does, that will only make us a stronger department and help rebuild public trust,” said Chicago Pplice Interim Superintendent Eddie Johnson.

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The summary says CPD’s own data proves the belief that police have no respect for the sanctity of life when it comes to people of color.

Between 2008-2015, 299 African Americans were hit or killed by police officers compared to 55 Hispanics and 33 whites.

Between 2012 and 2015, 1,435 African Americans were shot with Tasers, compared to 254 Hispanics and 144 whites.

Martinez Sutton is the brother of Rekia Boyd, shot and killed by Chicago Police in 2012.

When Sutton sees the task force’s recommendation, he says, “It’s like we know that, so now what are you going to do about it? What’s going to happen?”

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The chair of the task force, Lori Lightfoot, says the finds will be presented to the mayor and City Council Wednesday, followed by a news conference.