WASHINGTON (CBS) – The U.S. Supreme Court has ruled in favor of Colorado baker Jack Phillips with a 7-2 decision.

It was a case that pitted gay rights against religious interests, brought by a Christian baker in Lakewood who refused to make a wedding cake for two gay men.

Jack Phillips, owner of Masterpiece Cake in Colorado, waits to speak to the press outside the US Supreme Court after Masterpiece Cakeshop vs. Colorado Civil Rights Commission were heard on December 5, 2017 in Washington, DC.
The US Supreme Court is to hear arguments on Tuesday in a case that has been described as the most significant for gay rights since it approved same-sex marriage two years ago.
The landmark case pits a gay couple, Dave Mullins and Charlie Craig, against a Colorado bakery owner who refused in July 2012 to make a cake for their same-sex wedding reception. (Photo credit: BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images)

Phillips said his cakes are artistic expression and that creating a cake celebrating gay marriage violates his religious beliefs.

Story Archive: Masterpiece Cakeshop v. Colorado Civil Rights Commission

It started back when Charlie Craig and David Mullins went into Masterpiece Cakeshop in 2012 and asked for a cake for their wedding reception. Phillips refused.

David Mullins (L) and Charlie Craig wait to speak to journalists after the U.S. Supreme Court hear the case Masterpiece Cakeshop v. Colorado Civil Rights Commission December 5, 2017 in Washington, DC. Craig and Mullins filed a complaint with the commission in 2012 after conservative Christian baker Jack Phillips refused to sell them a wedding cake for their same-sex ceremony. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

Craig and Mullins said Phillips discriminated against them and violated their civil rights.

The Supreme Court heard oral arguments in the case in December. In their decision posted on Monday, the justices ruled the Colorado Civil Rights Commission didn’t maintain religious neutrality when it ruled against Phillips.

Read the court’s complete opinion at supremecourt.gov, with the majority opinion written by Kennedy. Kagan and Breyer were the only two judges who disagreed with the ruling.