CHICAGO (CBS) — Rolling Meadows isn’t known as a hot bed for high school hoops, but it’s become a preferred destination for college coaches on the recruiting trail. They’re all coming to see Max Christie, who’s already ranked ninth in the class of 2021.

Max Christie

“You could tell right away the talent he had, kids like that don’t come around very often,” Rolling Meadows head coach Kevin Katovich said.

Katovich knew right away when he met Christie, a scrawny 10-year old, that he would be a special talent. Now Max is one of the top sophomores in the country.

“Shooting, being a leader, getting my teammates involved, I think I can do it all,” Max  said.

“He is really a complete player. He can take it to the rim. He can dunk. He can shoot from three. He can pull up. He almost glides to the basket,” Katovich said.

Max is averaging 28 points a game and already has 15 double doubles this season. He comes from great basketball genes. His mom played at Northwestern, and his dad played at Wisconsin-Superior. But he still has to grow as a leader and into his 6 feet 6 inch, 170 pound frame.

“I think I will still grow. The maturation will come. Physically I am not the strongest kid,” Max said. “I am kind of quiet but need to be more more vocal, so I’m trying to push myself out of my comfort zone.”

Max has already received double digit scholarship offers from Division I schools including Northwestern, Illinois, Wisconsin and Stanford. So how does he handle all of the hype and recruiting at just 15?

“I just take it slow and just don’t think too much about it, especially with recruiting. I’m only 15, sophomore, just take my time and get my options open,” he said.

“It starts with his parents for really keeping him grounded, but he is just really rooted in wanting to play basketball,” Katovich said. “That extra noise, it doesn’t really get to him.”

But Max does have high aspirations.

“High school goals – probably win the state championship. College goals – to make it to the NBA and just get ready for outside of basketball when the ball stops bouncing, then long term NBA.”