CHICAGO (CBS) — Finally, there is some justice for a 98-year-old woman who was swindled out of her life savings – at least that is how the Cook County Public Guardian sees it.

Two of the woman’s former caregivers were slapped with financial crime felonies. And as CBS 2’s Dana Kozlov reported Monday, those charged are still refusing to talk.

“You know, I’m angry and just terribly disappointed,” said Grace Watanabe.

Watanabe’s advocates have been fighting to get her life savings back for more than year. Cook County Public Guardian Charles Golbert filed a civil lawsuit accusing former nursing home caregivers of stealing from her.

And now, Symphony Residences of Lincoln Park’s former office manager, Tameka Wolfe, and its former activities director, Christina Wright, are charged with financial exploitation of an elderly person – a felony.

Symphony Residences of Lincoln Park’s former office manager, Tameka Wolfe (left), and its former activities director, Christina Wright, are charged with financial exploitation of an elderly person after they allegedly bilked Grace Watanabe, now 98, out of her life savings. (Credit: CBS 2)

And now, Symphony Residences of Lincoln Park’s former office manager, Tameka Wolfe, and its former activities director, Christina Wright, are charged with financial exploitation of an elderly person – a felony.

“The two individuals who the state charged today where the highest-ranking employees of Symphony – the business manager and the activities director – who together took about a half million dollars; $500,000,” Golbert said. “They were clearly the ringleaders of all this.”

The total was actually more than $700,000. Golbert and prosecutors allege both women got huge checks from Watanabe, including one to Wolfe for $400,000.

They said the women also transferred tens of thousands of dollars from Watanabe’s accounts into their own – all while knowing she has dementia and also survived living in an internment camp.

“Full justice for Mrs. Watanabe requires that we get the money back from the civil suit, and that criminal justice happens to the perpetrators,” Golbert said.

Wolfe and Wright have been released on bond, but are under electronic monitoring. Attempts to reach both went nowhere.

While they face criminal charges, the civil case continues against Symphony Residences. Golbert said its owners and employees continue to refuse to answer deposition questions – and are now accruing a fine of $200 a day for being in contempt of court.

Among those pleading the fifth is the nursing home’s director, Erika Cruz.

“Her answers to those questions were Fifth Amendment, Fifth Amendment, and Fifth Amendment – and she still works there,” Golbert said.

Golbert said some of the ex-employees accused in the civil suit of taking money have given it back.

Kozlov left a message for Symphony Residences’ attorney, but did not get a return call.