By Jeremy Ross

CHICAGO (CBS) — While some sports camps are shutting down, starting Tuesday night, baseball is back in Rosemont.

It’s just one of the events expected to draw crowds during the reopening. CBS 2’s Jeremy Ross has more from Impact Field.

Crowds will be thinner to accommodate social distancing. Weeks from now, large crowds could gather for a big concert in Orland Park.

Berwyn’s Ides of March plays for virtual audiences these days. Keyboard player Scott May shares the impact of the pandemic on bands and fans.

“We’ve had to cancel so many shows because of COVID  and we’re very, very eager to get out and play again,” May said.

But on August 22, there’s hope this band and others that are part of Orland Park’s Centennial Park West series can take the outdoor stage in front of crowds that could be in the thousands — with proper precautions.

“We don’t know what it’s going to look like in seven weeks, but we do have contingency plans for social distancing and for temperature checks,” said Orland Park Mayor Keith Pekau. “We hope the numbers continue to trend in the right direction so we can actually host it.”

Is there a scenario where the event would be completely cancelled?

“Sure, if we see cases spike or see things that don’t make sense to do it, then well cancel it,” said Pekau.

He added that you will not see plans for mask wearing and other safety measures on Orland Park’s website, because he wants to adapt to real time COVID concerns closer to the event.

Photos show last year’s concert, where Pekau said the park can accommodate between 10,000 to 15,000. Attendance throughout the several acre venue can be limited this year for social distancing, but to what extent will become clearer in the weeks ahead.

To those concerned about bringing any size group together in a pandemic, Mayor Pekau said…

“We all want to see us return to normal. And at some point, you have to start returning to normal,” he noted.

Orland Park said it’s in touch with the same authorities as the state, from epidemiologists and scientists to monitor conditions.