By Jermont Terry

BUFFALO GROVE, Ill. (CBS) — A homeowner in the northwest suburbs put up a Christmas light display just to put smiles on people’s faces, but he he may shut down because he is now being told by the village that they are watching.

Go big or go home. This family’s Christmas display in Buffalo Grove is bright and big, and it’s bringing out the crowds. That is where the village comes in.

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It’s a show for all with colors and lights seen afar. Elizabeth Storozhuk, 12, asked her dad if they could do it big for Christmas.

“I was like, ‘No this is impossible, but then this happened. I’m like, ‘Wow…that took forever,'” she said. 

Nearly 20,000 lights synchronized to music were erected in a mere four weeks.

“I don’t want to say happy. I’m excited,” said Misha Storozhuk, who created the display.

The Christmas display is big, and the view from above shows just how bright it gets. But it’s not the glare or the stares that has the village concerned.

“It’s the best thing that could have happened to town,” one spectator said.

But the Village of Buffalo Grove does not see it that way.

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After the family lit up the neighborhood for July 4th and Halloween, huge crowds gathered. So for Christmas the village forced the family to get a permit.

“I was surprised why I needed to do it, but I was willing to cooperate,” said Misha. “I understand their concern about traffic. They said I need to pay $50.”

The light bill is more than that, so Dad agreed. Yet, after getting the permit, the village slapped him with many stipulations. Among them, it could stop the display at any moment, and he could pay a fee if police are called for any reason.

“I was told $80 to $90 per hour,” said Misha.

There is no charge to have neighbors stop by.

“Our profit for it is just people’s smiles,” said Misha.

And there are plenty of those on this block. Dad is prepared to keep them running all month, but it’s contingent on how much of a grinch he says the village becomes.

Police placed signs throughout the block telling people to keep it moving.

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