CBS 2 Chicago wbbm7801059 670 The Score

Local

Gun Restriction Bills Fail In Springfield

View Comments
File Photo Of A Handgun (Photo by Mark Nolan/Getty Images)

File Photo Of A Handgun (Photo by Mark Nolan/Getty Images)

Lastest News Headlines:

Get Breaking News First

Receive News, Politics, and Entertainment Headlines Each Morning.
Sign Up

SPRINGFIELD, Ill. (WBBM/CBS) – A couple of bills to further control the movement of guns in Illinois have failed to pass the state House.

As WBBM Newsradio 780’s Dave Dahl reports, one bill would have required gun owners to call police within 72 hours of their firearms being stolen.

Downstate Rep. Ron Stephens (R-Greenville) accuses the sponsor of interfering with the Second Amendment.

“That is my right, and shouldn’t be infringed by law enforcement people saying, ‘You know what? About that constitutional right of yours, we’ve got some amendments to it. If you want to amend our constitutional rights, take it to the people. We have a process for that. Otherwise, leave our guns alone.”

The sponsor of may call the bill again.

LISTEN: Newsradio 780’s Dave Dahl reports

The other bill that failed would have limited Illinois residents to buying one gun per month. It was sponsored by state Rep. Will Burns (D-Chicago), who is soon to leave the chamber to become a Chicago alderman.

State Rep. Roger Eddy (R-Hutsonville) says outlaws will have guns regardless of restrictions or lack thereof.

“Those who wish to use guns to break the law and use handguns illegally and for violent purposes, are going to do it whether or not – this is just another law they’re going to break,” Eddy said.

Countered Burns, “They can’t break the law if they’re going to buy the gun at a licensed gun dealer, because a licensed gun dealer can only sell that person one gun per month.”

A bill that would allow Illinois residents to carry concealed weapons is also pending in the state House of Representatives.

Last month, the House Agriculture Committee passed a concealed carry bill by a vote of 12-2. But the committee is dominated by downstate pro-gun rights lawmakers, and the bill must pass the full state General Assembly.

View Comments