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Grant Park Repairs Continue Nearly Two Weeks After Lollapalooza

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Large swaths of grass at Grant Park were still brown and dried out and other patches of grass were instead patches of dirt, nearly two weeks after Lollapalooza wrapped up in 2011. (Credit: CBS)

Large swaths of grass at Grant Park were still brown and dried out and other patches of grass were instead patches of dirt, nearly two weeks after Lollapalooza wrapped up in 2011. (Credit: CBS)

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CHICAGO (WBBM) – The normally lush, green grass of Grant Park remains brown and dried out as crews work on fixing the damage from the Lollapalooza music festival, which ended almost two weeks ago.

But, as WBBM Newsradio’s Regine Schlesinger reports, an environmental activist says he wouldn’t have it any other way.

Some say after the muddy mess left behind by this year’s Lollapalooza, maybe it’s time to evict the music festival and its crowds from Grant Park.

LISTEN: WBBM Newsradio’s Regine Schlesinger reports

Bob O’Neill, president of the Grant Park Conservancy, said that if he didn’t know better, he might be tempted to say that himself.

“Normally, I’d walk up here and I’d see this and I’d be really upset,” he said.

But O’Neill said that with some of the profits from Lollapalooza plugged back into Chicago parks and programs, it’s well worth the trouble.

“This helps keep taxes dollars down because the Park District doesn’t have to raise tax dollars if they can raise the money privately. It supports parks throughout the city, so bear with us, this will be restored,” O’Neill said.

Besides bringing visitors from around the world and tens of millions of dollars into the local economy, O’Neill said it contributes about $2 million for environmental programs, on top of the money that concert organizers will pay to repair damage to the park.

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