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Brenly ‘Would Love’ Opportunity To Manage Again

Bob Brenly

Bob Brenly. (Photo Credit: Getty)

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(WSCR) With the Cubs search for a new general manager well under way, rumors of the looming dismissal of manager Mike Quade are in full force.

Former Diamondbacks manager and current Cubs TV color analyst Bob Brenly said if the Cubs came to him about managing, he would be interested.

“I guess my attitude is, I’m not hiding,” Brenly told The McNeil and Spiegel Show on Tuesday. “They know where to find me. If they feel that I’m the guy for the job, I would love to interview. I would love to sit down and talk about the future of the organization. I think I said it a year or so ago, I don’t feel comfortable actively pursuing jobs right now. If a team thinks I’m the right guy for the job, absolutely I’d love another opportunity to get back down on the field.”

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Brenly managed the Diamondbacks to the team’s only World Series title in 2001.

Still, Brenly said the entire Cubs organization is in a state of fluctuation with no GM and no long-term manager in place.

“I don’t think anybody — at this point in Chicago — really has any kind of inside information or (knows) who the front-line candidates, or at least the front runners might be, or at least anyone who is close to being named the GM or a possible replacement for Mike Quade, should the Cubs go that direction,” Brenly said. “Everybody is just kind of flapping in the wind right now, including the Cubs organization.”

Brenly also said if a first-tier manager became available, like Terry Francona, the Cubs should do whatever they can to lock him up, regardless of how much it costs.

“When bench players are making $4 million a year and middle relievers are making $8 million, it seems silly to go on the cheap with your field manager,” Brenly said.