White Sox

WSJ Study: Ken Harrelson Is The Most Biased Broadcaster In Baseball

White Sox batting helmet. (Credit: Brian Bahr  /Allsport)

White Sox batting helmet. (Credit: Brian Bahr /Allsport)

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(WSCR) For anyone who has ever watched a White Sox game on television, this will come as no surprised.

According to a study conducted by the Wall Street Journal, White Sox TV play-by-play man Ken “The Hawk” Harrelson was named the most biased broadcaster in Major League Baseball.

The following comes from the WSJ:

Prompted by Harrelson’s unabashed homerism, the Journal decided to watch one nine-inning game played by every major-league team to evaluate its local broadcasters for bias. To keep things simple, we only evaluated home games that the home teams won.

By the rules of our study, anyone with a microphone who used a pronoun like “we,” “us” or “our” to describe the home team was given a citation. Obscure pet names for players were also flagged: The Detroit Tigers announcers, for instance, referred to backup catcher Gerald Laird as “G-Money.” Additional penalties were given for things like excessive moping after miscues or unrestrained glee after big moments. (A Miami Marlins broadcaster marked the end of a lengthy scoreless drought by screaming “Hallelujah!”)

After reviewing all 30 teams, Harrelson was easily the most biased broadcaster, based on the study. Hawk made 104 biased comments during the nine-inning game, with second place, announcers Matt Underwood and Rick Manning of the Indians, making 23 biased comments.

Click here to view the full list!