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IG Ferguson: Emanuel Administration Heeds Advice More Often Than Daley

Joe Ferguson

Chicago city Inspector General Joe Ferguson. (Credit: CBS)

dellimore250 Craig Dellimore
Craig Dellimore, political editor for WBBM, joined the station in 1983...
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CHICAGO (CBS) – Despite their public disputes, Chicago Inspector Joseph Ferguson said Mayor Rahm Emanuel’s administration has adopted more of his recommendations on fighting waste and fraud than former Mayor Richard M. Daley.

WBBM Newsradio’s Craig Dellimore reports Ferguson and Emanuel have tangled in court over his subpoena powers, and there have been public disputes about Ferguson’s access to information, as well as some of his findings while investigating corruption and waste.

However, Ferguson said when it comes to putting his recommendations into effect, the Emanuel administration has been willing and able.

“There are times where the disagreement is perfectly … well-taken and valid – the opposing view, from our perspective – but they’re received seriously, and they are acted on to a far greater extent with the present administration than previously experienced,” Ferguson told aldermen at a city budget hearing.

Ferguson told reporters afterward the Emanuel administration often heeds his advice on implementing reforms.

“I meant it. Everybody is in the pool; jumped into the pool and trying to figure out ways to do things better,” Ferguson said. “The fact that communications may be strained, and the fact that we may be putting out findings that are viewed negatively – for their political consequences – doesn’t change the fact that actually at the end of the day, many of the recommendations are being acted upon.”

He was hired in 2009 under Daley, but after frequent clashes with Emanuel, the mayor briefly suggested he might not reappoint Ferguson to a new term. They ultimately came to an agreement, and Ferguson is still on the job for another four years.