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Immigration Activist Arellano Returns To Chicago

Immigrant rights activist Elvira Arellano, a Mexican immigrant, stands with her son Saul at a press conference inside the Adalberto United Methodist Church in Chicago on Aug. 15, 2007. Arellano took refuge in the church for a year after she was ordered to report to the U.S. immigration office to face deportation. She eventually left the church to lobby Congress for immigration reform, and was deported. (Credit:  JEFF HAYNES/AFP/Getty Images)

Immigrant rights activist Elvira Arellano, a Mexican immigrant, stands with her son Saul at a press conference inside the Adalberto United Methodist Church in Chicago on Aug. 15, 2007. Arellano took refuge in the church for a year after she was ordered to report to the U.S. immigration office to face deportation. She eventually left the church to lobby Congress for immigration reform, and was deported. (Credit: JEFF HAYNES/AFP/Getty Images)

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CHICAGO (CBS) — An undocumented immigrant who holed up in a Chicago church for a year is back and trying a new tack to stay in the U.S.

WBBM’s Nancy Harty reports this time, Elvira Arellano says she gave herself up to immigration officials as she crossed into California from Mexico, saying she was seeking a humanitarian visa.

Through an interpreter, she said she and her nearly five-month-old son were released.

“She said I am so happy to be here to be part of the dream my son has, but I cannot forget those faces of those children that were waiting for her when she got out of detention hoping also that their mother would be able to come out,” Arellano said through an interpreter.

Arellano was released on supervision and has to report back in six months. She was deported in 2007 after spending a year in Adalberto United Methodist Church.

Her attorney says he thinks she has a good shot at getting asylum on the grounds that her high-profile immigration work and her U.S. citizen son have made her a target in Mexico.