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Reports: Drugs Played A Part In Darius Paul’s Suspension

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(CBS) News broke on Tuesday afternoon that Illinois sophomore forward Darius Paul had been suspended for the entirety of the 2014-’15 season, and a clearer picture as to why emerged today.

In addition to charges of underage drinking and resisting an officer, Paul was looking to acquire Dimethyltryptamine (DMT) at the time of his arrest on April 22, the Chicago Tribune reported.

Details from the Tribune:

Paul admitted that he had been drinking before his arrest, according to a copy of the police report obtained by the Tribune. The report also states that Paul told officers that he had met a man in an alley that night who was taking him to buy Dimethyltryptamine (DMT), a dangerous club drug that has gained popularity in recent years.  

DMT  — which can be smoked, snorted or injected —  induces intense hallucinations, causing users to become unaware of their surroundings, according to the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration. The federal government classifies it as a Schedule 1 drug, meaning it has no accepted medical use for treatment of any kind in this country. 

Paul’s attorney also told the Champaign News-Gazette that Paul also failed two drug tests after smoking marijuana last fall.

Paul released a statement apologizing for his actions and said while basketball isn’t the focus now, he would like to continue his career at Illinois.

“I want to apologize, I regret my conduct, I am sorry for putting myself and my family in this situation,” Paul said, according to the News-Gazette. “I appreciate the job the police officers have to do … This incident shows that I overreacted to the police and the things that happened on that street. Being out drinking with friends seems like fun, but look where I’m at now. I can only hope others can see how the choices we make as students can impact our lives.”