Chicago Job Seekers Will See A Large Increase In Available Health Care Jobs

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(credit: Thinkstock)

(credit: Thinkstock)

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Although there are still sectors of the job market that are experiencing a decline, health care is experiencing a rise in need. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, “Nineteen of the 30 occupations projected to grow fastest from 2012 to 2022 typically require some form of post-secondary education for entry.” While other professions require a minimum of a bachelor’s degree in order to achieve an entry-level position, health care positions are available to those with an associate’s degree.

(Photo Courtesy of Kelly Fay)

(Photo Courtesy of Kelly Fay)

Also, experts are anticipating huge projected growth for new jobs. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, “The 30 occupations with the largest projected increase in employment from 2012 to 2022 will account for 7.4 million new jobs, almost half of the total projected employment growth. Of the 30 occupations projected to have the largest percentage increase between 2012 and 2022, 14 are related to health care. The health care and social assistance sector is projected to grow at an annual rate of 2.6 percent, adding 5 million jobs between 2012 and 2022. This accounts for nearly one-third of the total projected increase in jobs. The growth reflects, in part, the demand for health care workers to address the needs of an aging population.”

Kelly Fay is an RN care manager for Cancer Treatment Centers of America (CTCA) at Midwestern Regional Medical Center. With experience working at a nursing home facility, Kelly can give some insight into caring for the elderly.

When asked about her inspiration, Kelly stated, “I grew close to many residents, especially those who didn’t have family. I remember a night nurse called me well past midnight informing me that Gertrude, a German-speaking resident, was dying. I could speak a few phrases in German and was the only nursing assistant she wasn’t combative with. Gertrude would hold my hand and just want me next to her to provide her comfort. At 19 years old, I gave Gertrude the most peaceful and dignified end of life care I knew how. I planned to continue my nursing education to positively impact the lives of others on the continuum; birth to death.”

Sara Lugardo is a professional writer out of Chicago, Illinois. She has a bachelor’s in communication and is currently working on her master’s. Her work can be found on Examiner.com.

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