CHICAGO (CBS/AP) — Governor-elect Bruce Rauner on Thursday named a transition team of advisers that includes two prominent Democrats, former White House chief of staff Bill Daley and former Southern Illinois University President Glenn Poshard.

The team also includes former Republican Gov. Jim Edgar, Republican Congressman Aaron Schock, Caterpillar Inc. CEO Doug Oberhelman and the Rev. James Meeks, one of the African American ministers from Chicago who had supported his campaign.

The Republican venture capitalist ousted Democratic Gov. Pat Quinn in a close contest Tuesday. In a victory speech, he vowed “to find solutions, bipartisan solutions, to solve the problems of Illinois.”

Daley is the son of late Chicago Mayor Richard J. Daley and the brother of Richard M. Daley, both of whom served more than two decades as mayor of Chicago.

Bill Daley originally planned a primary campaign against Quinn for the Democratic nomination but abruptly dropped the challenge in September last year.

At the time, Daley insisted he could have won but that he didn’t have the heart for a prolonged battle to fix the state’s monumental problems. He also predicted that Quinn would lose to a Republican.

Poshard, who served five terms in Congress and was a member of the state General Assembly before that, lost the gubernatorial race in 1998 to Republican George Ryan.

Rauner named his running mate, Lt. governor-elect Evelyn Sanguinetti, to head the team. They’ll help the transition into office on a range of issues.

In a statement on Thursday, Rauner says he’s chosen from a “broad range” of community, business, faith and political leaders.

While pledging to work with lawmakers, Rauner also urged that they respect the voters’ decision about what direction the state should go in.

That apparently included Gov. Quinn’s parting promise to return to Springfield and work to raise the minimum wage. Rauner revealed that he voted in favor of the ballot referendum to raise the minimum wage to $10, but he repeated his campaign position that it had to be accompanied by “pro-business” reforms.

While pledging to work with lawmakers, Rauner also urged that they respect the voters’ decision about what direction the state should go in.

That apparently included Gov. Quinn’s parting promise to return to Springfield and work to raise the minimum wage. Rauner revealed that he voted in favor of the ballot referendum to raise the minimum wage to $10, but he repeated his campaign position that it had to be accompanied by “pro-business” reforms.

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