Chicago (CBS) — UPDATE: Blood test results reveal Vandervere has a blood alcohol level of 0.316, nearly four times the legal limit of 0.08.

A Beach Park man, whose Wisconsin driver’s license has been revoked, has been charged with reckless homicide for causing a triple fatal car accident in Bristol on Friday evening, according to the Kenosha County Sheriff’s Department.

Timothy Vandervere, 40, faces several charges, including three counts of reckless homicide and three counts of knowingly operating after revocation causing death.

Timothy Vandervere (Credit: Kenosha County Sheriff’s Department)

Around 6:45 p.m. Friday, officials responded to a two-vehicle crash in the 21600 block of Highway 50 in Bristol, Wisconsin.

A witness had initially called to report a white pickup driving erratically and at a high rate of speed.

Listen to the 911 call here:

 

According to the Kenosha County Sheriff’s Department, Vandervere was going 100 miles per hour or more when he crashed his white GMC pickup into a Jeep Cherokee traveling east on Highway 50.

The Jeep was driven by 72-year-old Gerald Rizzo of Kenosha, Wisconsin. He was taken to a local hospital where he was stabilized with serious injuries.

“Mr. Vandervere was traveling at such a high speed that he crushed the rear end of Mr. Rizzo’s car and hit him with such velocity and force that it propelled Mr. Rizzo’s car forward causing it to flip over,” Kenosha Deputy District Attorney Angelina Gabriele said.

The three other passengers of the Jeep, all Kenosha medical professionals, were killed.

Dr. Michael Rizzo, 67, was pronounced dead at the scene of the accident.

Dr. Vincent Rizzo, 76, was transported to St. Catherine’s Hospital and pronounced dead.

Mary Rizzo, 74, was transported to Aurora Hospital, then transferred to Froedtert Hospital in Milwaukee where she was later pronounced dead.

Vandervere has been charged with three felony counts of reckless homicide, three felony counts of knowingly operating after revocation causing death, one felony count of reckless injury, and one felony count of knowingly operating after revocation causing great bodily harm.

First responders noted Vandervere’s eyes were glassy and they could smell “intoxicants”.

Police said a blood sample was taken from Vandervere for testing, and that the criminal charges might be modified depending on the results of the blood tests.

Vandervere has a prior conviction for injury by intoxicated use of a motor vehicle in 2005, and holds a valid Illinois driver’s license; but his Wisconsin driver’s license is revoked.

According to CBS affiliate WDJT, Vandervere’s lawyers argued for $100,000 bond at a court hearing Tuesday, but the court commissioner ultimately decided to go with the state’s suggestion of $2 million, calling Vandervere a “flight risk.”

Vandervere is scheduled to appear in court for his preliminary hearing April 18.