CHICAGO (CBS) — It’s not just Chicago that’s getting ready to welcome back visitors.

Outside the city, museums and zoos are among the attractions are re-opening.

CBS 2’s Jim Williams reports there are restrictions.

CBS 2 spoke to representatives of several attractions and they all said the same thing:

Under Illinois’ Phase 4 re-opening: plan ahead. Don’t just show up.

The preparations and precautions have been underway for months. The plans for visitors are now in place.

“We have cleaned the museum from top to bottom,” said Susan Abrams of the Illinois Holocaust Museum.

“We’re spreading people out. We’re welcoming them back,” added Harriett Resnick of the Chicago Botanic Garden.

That’s because the state’s Phase 4 reopening is about to start. The Chicago Botanic Garden in Glencoe has been permitting visitors to use its 2.3 mile perimeter path since June 9.

Starting this week, you’ll be allowed to see most of the gardens and use the cafe. The Chicago Botanic Garen’s vice president Harriet Resnick said even members will need reservations.

“You just can’t show up anymore,” Resnick said.

Museums, theaters, zoos and other attractions all have to limit capacity. You have to buy tickets for admission and parking before you get to Brookfield zoo. No tickets to be sold on site.

The zoo reopens to the general public July 8.

“We have been looking forward to getting the word that we can reopen the museum, Abrams said.

That’ll be July 15 for the Illinois Holocaust Museum. And visitors can expect these precautions when they get there.

“We have in place a thermal scanner. So when our visitors come, we will take their temperature. We will offer hand sanitizer. If they don’t have a mask, we offer them a mask because that’s required,” Abrams said.

Illinois’ attractions, closed for more than three months and losing revenue, will soon operate with fewer visitors. But still reopening.

For the Art Institute of Chicago, that’s scheduled for late July.

“It’s been a difficult time for all of us, but we are really looking forward to be able to reopen,” said Kati Murphy of the Art Institute.