WHEATON, Ill. (CBS) — A DuPage County judge on Monday turned down prosecutors’ request to order an electronic monitoring device for Dr. Arkan Alrashid, a gastroenterologist accused of forcing a former coworker to perform oral sex on him last year after a business dinner in Oak Brook.

Alrashid posted bail after turning himself in on Tuesday on two charges of criminal sexual assault, but DuPage County prosecutors also wanted a judge to place him on electronic monitoring as he awaits trial.

The doctor, who has offices in Libertyville, is accused of forcing a former co-worker to perform oral sex on him as they were driving together after a business dinner at Gibson’s Bar & Steakhouse in Oak Brook. Prosecutors said he also forced his fingers into her vagina.

Despite prosecutors presenting claims from four other women, a DuPage County judge declined their request for Alrashid to be placed on electronic monitoring while he is free on bail.

Alrashid’s defense attorneys argued a GPS monitoring bracelet would interfere with MRI machines, so Alrashid wouldn’t be able to work.

While the judge didn’t order a GPS bracelet for Alrashid, he did grant prosecutors’ request that Alrashid be ordered to surrender his passport, as well as any firearms. He’s also prohibited from having any contact with the victim or her family, and must report at least once a week to the court’s pretrial unit, as well as after every court date.

He’s due back in court on Nov. 4.

In a statement, Dalia Thomas, chief operating officer of GI Partners of Illinois, where Alrashid is president, said the doctor “denies these allegations and is vigorously defending the charges in court:

“Dr. Arkan Alrashid, president of GI Partners of Illinois LLC, has been charged with criminal sexual assault that purportedly occurred in February 2019. Dr. Alrashid denies these allegations and is vigorously defending the charges in court. He has cooperated with the authorities and has retained defense counsel to conduct a rigorous investigation and defense. He is confident the evidence will prove that the accusations are false.

“It is important to note that an allegation or charge is not evidence of guilt. Under the United States Constitution, an accused person is presumed innocent and entitled to a fair trial at which the government has the burden of proving guilt beyond a reasonable doubt. Dr. Alrashid maintains his innocence and intends to plead not guilty to these charges. Out of respect for the process, Dr. Alrashid cannot comment on the pending allegations.”

The Illinois Department of Financial and Professional Regulation said they are aware of the charges against Alrashid and “we take such allegations seriously.” However, they said they could not reveal if they are investigating him for possible disciplinary action.

“The department is prohibited by law from commenting on whether it has an open investigation into any particular licensee, or the status of any such investigation,” a spokesperson said in a statement.

Alrashid’s medical license in Wisconsin was suspended for one year in 2003, after a patient accused him of sexual misconduct.

According to Wisconsin Department of Regulation & Licensing records, the woman saw Alrashid for a pelvic exam in July 2000, after she believed she had developed a urinary tract infection.

During the exam at the hospital where they both worked, the woman said she told Alrashid she was taking medication for depression, and was feeling drowsy, so he took her to the doctor’s lounge to rest. While there, he began kissing her and had sexual contact with her. The woman said she believed unless she did what Alrashid asked her to do sexually, he would breach her privacy. She later reported him to the licensing board.

Alrashid’s license to practice medicine in Wisconsin was suspended for one year, and reinstated in 2004.