CHICAGO (CBS) — Monday, Monday – can’t trust that day, as the old song goes.

You might already be dreaming of Friday, looking to get away for the weekend, or even wanting escape for the whole month.

More and more families are booking long-term stays outside their hometowns, places with strong wi-fi and spots to play. CBS 2’s Lauren Victory took us inside the growing list of options to learn and work remotely – in more than on sense of the word.

Michelle Shainess of Minnesota and her family were on the open highway for six weeks. The family of five called it their U.S. COVID road trip.

“It was great for the kids to have new space to play and learn,” Shainess said.

Shainess took the concept of social distancing to new heights, finishing off the school year far from home. They hit eight states and traveled almost 6,000 miles.

“It’s not always easy, but we did select properties that were conducive to both work and learning,” she said.

You could say these jetsetters – or perhaps car-setters, are also trendsetters. Their trip was back in the spring.

Now, escaping to working remote remotely is getting so popular that Airbnb listings far outside of metro areas – such as one we found six hours north of Chicago – are boasting about views and new high-speed wifi.

“We’ve gone from WFH – work from home – basically to WFA – work from anywhere,” said CBS News Travel Editor Peter Greenberg. “And now it’s taken an additional turn – work from hotel.”

Greenberg is talking about an even newer phenomenon. Hyatt is just one hotel chain that is promoting their properties as primo remote sites.

“You’ve got a little bit of a work-vacation combined scenario,” said Asad Ahmed, Senior Vice President of Hyatt Commercial Services Americas.

Ahmed heads the team running the “Work from Hyatt” offer at about 60 different locations. The catch is that it’s a minimum seven-night stay, but maybe that’s not hard to stomach given the lovely environment guests get.

How does e-learning from Florida, South Carolina, or Vermont sound?

“You have the comforts of home, but you’re being taken care of a little bit because you’re in a hotel environment, which is really nice,” Asad said. “This is an opportunity for folks to get out and be pampered a little bit.”

”It’s a win-win for a lot of people,” Greenberg said.

Greenberg also pointed to another budding alternative – thousands of private homes managed and cleaned by Marriott.

Of course, it sounds great until everyone has the same idea.

“The good news is, people are just beginning to figure this out,” Greenberg said.

 

Lauren Victory