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Teen Gets 26 Years In Derrion Albert’s Beating Death

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Derrion Albert (CBS Local)

Derrion Albert (CBS Local)

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CHICAGO (CBS) – A 17-year-old boy is going to prison for 26 years, after admitting to participating in the brutal beating that killed honor student Derrion Albert back in 2009.

Eric Carson, 17, had pleaded guilty to first-degree murder in the Sept. 24, 2009, incident that killed Albert, 16.

The Chicago Tribune reports that Carson wept in court Friday as he said goodbye to his family. The 26-year sentence was part of an agreement with prosecutors.

Carson was 16 at the time of the attack. He was seen on the video hitting Albert on the back of the head with a large board. Albert was then beaten and stomped by several other teens.

Two other defendants have been convicted in Albert’s death.

A 15-year-old boy was convicted in Juvenile Court, and will remain in custody at the Juvenile Temporary Detention Center until he is 21.

Another defendant, Silvonus Shannon, 20, was also convicted, but has yet to be sentenced.

Two others, Eugene Riley, 19, and Lapoleon Colbert, 20, are still awaiting trial.

Albert was an honor student at Fenger High School, 10220 S. Wallace St. He was walking home past the Agape Community Center, 342 W. 111th St., when he was caught in the middle of a fight between Fenger students who lived in “The Ville” neighborhood near the school, and students who lived more than four miles south in the Altgeld Gardens public housing development.

Albert died of his injuries.

The fight was also captured on a cell phone video, which was seen around the world and drew unflattering attention to the city.

Albert’s death prompted President Barack Obama to call for a national conversation on violence. The month after the incident, U.S. Atty. Gen. Eric Holder and U.S. Education Sec. Arne Duncan visited Chicago to discuss ways to combat youth violence.

(TM and © Copyright 2011 CBS Radio Inc. and its relevant subsidiaries. CBS Radio and EYE Logo TM and Copyright 2010 CBS Broadcasting Inc. Used under license. All Rights Reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed. The Associated Press contributed to this report.)

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