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When Disaster Strikes On Wedding Day: The CDC Wants You To Be Prepared

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(credit: Thinkstock)

(credit: Thinkstock)

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CHICAGO (CBS) — A lot of planning goes into your wedding day–the food, the dress, the invitations, the photographer, assessing the family drama–but what if disaster strikes?

We’re not talking about if just the wedding cake collapses. We are talking about an actual disaster.

Tornadoes, severe storms, massive power outages, or a medical emergency are just some of the unplanned events that could ruin a Chicago wedding.

The Center For Disease Control And Prevention, the agency typically in charge of protecting us from disease and keeping us healthy, is here to help.

They have come up the a Wedding Day Survival Guide, based around three key principles: Get A Kit, Make A Plan and Be Informed

Build A Kit

The CDC recommends that every bridal kit include extra safety pins, makeup for touch-ups (kinda obvious), and a few sedatives (seriously).

The kit should also include a “go-bag” with first aid items, bottles of water, snacks, medicine, cash and important documents in the event of a natural disaster or mass evacuation. Even if there isn’t large-scale mayhem, water’s always helpful to keep an over-heated guest hydrated, while bandages may be useful to tape up a clumsy member of your bridal party.

Make A Plan

What if severe weather strikes? You need a way to keep communications open. Make a plan to contact guests and keep a list of emergency numbers. The CDC also suggests designating a “runner” to take care of errands and be the contact person for any questions from guests.

You should also ask the manager of your reception venue for emergency plans and evacuation routes. After all, 200 guests won’t be able to cram into one small windowless space in the event of a tornado.

Stay Informed

Emergencies could range from a wedding gown malfunction to a storm to a health crisis. More likely, emotions could run high among family and friends.

Do your homework and have a plan to deal with any crisis. Always be calm if a bride or groom gets stressed out. Sometimes, the CDC says, a bottle of water (or remember that sedative!) will help.

Be supportive and have some bottled water from your emergency kit and a box of chocolate on hand. A kind gesture can ease tension.

And, never, ever forget to check the weather report.

More on CDC’s wedding safety tips can be found here.

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